ORCOPS Mission

The Oregon Coalition of Police & Sheriffs (ORCOPS) is a non-partisan organization that advocates on behalf of  police officers, deputy sheriffs and other individuals in Oregon law enforcement agencies. ORCOPS serves as a source of leadership within the law enforcement community and aims to build trust between law enforcement officers and the communities we serve.


3 days ago

ORCOPS

Sheriff Roberts talked about the state's #SafeOregon Tip Line for schools in the latest issue of #ClackCoQuarterly (last page): www.clackamas.us/pga/documents/clackco201802.pdf

Over 80 Clackamas County schools are now officially signed up for the service. Learn more at safeoregon.com
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3 days ago

ORCOPS

Happy 4th Birthday to Washington County Sheriff's Office's #K9 Chase 🐾🎂K-9 Chase turns 4 today! 🐾 🎂 ... See MoreSee Less

Happy 4th Birthday to Washington County Sheriffs Offices #K9 Chase 🐾🎂

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Happy Birthday, Chase. We saw/met you at the K9 trials in Hillsboro. You are a hero❤️❤️🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸. Stay safe, buddy.

Happy Birthday K9 Chase 👏👏😍😍🐶🐶🐾🐾💙💙💙💙

5 days ago

ORCOPS

The 2018 Legislative Session began on Monday, February 5 and is now is well underway. It’s only a five week session, which means the work is moving at an incredibly quick pace. As always, the ORCOPS team did a great deal of preparation work before session began, laying the groundwork to do everything possible to benefit our members. We’ve also situated ourselves as the “go-to” resource when legislators want to know how public policy changes may affect the working conditions for Oregon’s law enforcement officers.

Here’s what we’ve been working on so far:

House Bill 4122
This bill was submitted on behalf of ORCOPS, and is one of our highest priorities in the session. The bill would correct an oversight and allow a group of officers at OHSU the opportunity to join the Public Employees Retirement System. We worked closely with Representative Jeff Barker (D-Beaverton) and Representative Chris Gorsek (D-Gresham) who stood alongside us as we presented the bill to the House Committee on Business and Labor. The bill passed out of the committee with a unanimous vote and a “do pass” recommendation. It’s now headed to House Ways and Means Committee. The bill has been assigned a “minimal” fiscal impact, which means its effect on the state budget is negligible, and the committee is more likely pass it through to the House and Senate floors for a vote.

House Bill 4056
We’re working this bill to correct a gap in benefits for families of fallen or disabled officers. Because of inconsistencies between the rules for the Public Safety Memorial Fund, the Higher Education Coordinating Commission, and federal benefits, some families are missing out on assistance for higher education. Representative Andy Olson (R-Albany) and Representative Brad Witt (D-Clatskanie) introduced this bill and have been working with families of fallen officers to make sure these oversights are fixed. Representative Jeff Barker is the Chair of the House Judiciary Committee where the bill is being heard and has made this a priority. A bipartisan remedy is in the works to close the gap, and ensure all families of fallen or disabled officers get what they need to send their children to college.

Senate Bill 1531
This bill was introduced by Senator Lew Frederick (D-Portland), which originally would have imposed a mandate for police officers to get mental health counseling every two years. ORCOPS has strongly opposed the mandatory provision in the bill. The bill was heard in the Senate Judiciary Committee, which is chaired by Senator Floyd Prozanski (D-Eugene). Senator Prozanski opted not to move the bill out of committee, so it’s not likely to pass this session. ORCOPS has been working with Senator Frederick’s office and talking with the Senate Judiciary Committee members on something for the 2019 session that would allow first responders voluntary access to wellness programs alongside an increase in benefits and improved workers compensation provisions.

Behind the scenes, the lobby team continues to have good conversations with staff and legislators about the priorities for ORCOPS.

Get ORCOPS Legislative Update in your 📧>>> bit.ly/GetORCOPSUpdates
... See MoreSee Less

The 2018 Legislative Session began on Monday, February 5 and is now is well underway. It’s only a five week session, which means the work is moving at an incredibly quick pace. As always, the ORCOPS team did a great deal of preparation work before session began, laying the groundwork to do everything possible to benefit our members. We’ve also situated ourselves as the “go-to” resource when legislators want to know how public policy changes may affect the working conditions for Oregon’s law enforcement officers.

Here’s what we’ve been working on so far:

House Bill 4122
This bill was submitted on behalf of ORCOPS, and is one of our highest priorities in the session. The bill would correct an oversight and allow a group of officers at OHSU the opportunity to join the Public Employees Retirement System. We worked closely with Representative Jeff Barker (D-Beaverton) and Representative Chris Gorsek (D-Gresham) who stood alongside us as we presented the bill to the House Committee on Business and Labor. The bill passed out of the committee with a unanimous vote and a “do pass” recommendation. It’s now headed to House Ways and Means Committee. The bill has been assigned a “minimal” fiscal impact, which means its effect on the state budget is negligible, and the committee is more likely pass it through to the House and Senate floors for a vote.

House Bill 4056
We’re working this bill to correct a gap in benefits for families of fallen or disabled officers. Because of inconsistencies between the rules for the Public Safety Memorial Fund, the Higher Education Coordinating Commission, and federal benefits, some families are missing out on assistance for higher education. Representative Andy Olson (R-Albany) and Representative Brad Witt (D-Clatskanie) introduced this bill and have been working with families of fallen officers to make sure these oversights are fixed. Representative Jeff Barker is the Chair of the House Judiciary Committee where the bill is being heard and has made this a priority.  A bipartisan remedy is in the works to close the gap, and ensure all families of fallen or disabled officers get what they need to send their children to college.

Senate Bill 1531
This bill was introduced by Senator Lew Frederick (D-Portland), which originally would have imposed a mandate for police officers to get mental health counseling every two years. ORCOPS has strongly opposed the mandatory provision in the bill. The bill was heard in the Senate Judiciary Committee, which is chaired by Senator Floyd Prozanski (D-Eugene). Senator Prozanski opted not to move the bill out of committee, so it’s not likely to pass this session. ORCOPS has been working with Senator Frederick’s office and talking with the Senate Judiciary Committee members on something for the 2019 session that would allow first responders voluntary access to wellness programs alongside an increase in benefits and improved workers compensation provisions.

Behind the scenes, the lobby team continues to have good conversations with staff and legislators about the priorities for ORCOPS.

Get ORCOPS Legislative Update in your 📧>>> http://bit.ly/GetORCOPSUpdates

5 days ago

ORCOPS

Celebrating Black History Month: Portland Police Bureau's first African-American police chief was Charles Moose, who served from 1993-1999. Chief Danielle Outlaw is Portland’s first female African-American police chief. She was sworn in on October 2, 2017.

#BlackHistoryMonthCelebrating Black History Month: Portland’s first African-American police chief was Charles Moose, who served from 1993-1999. Chief Danielle Outlaw is Portland’s first female African-American police chief. She was sworn in on October 2, 2017.
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Celebrating Black History Month: Portland Police Bureaus first African-American police chief was Charles Moose, who served from 1993-1999. Chief Danielle Outlaw is Portland’s first female African-American police chief. She was sworn in on October 2, 2017.

#BlackHistoryMonth

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Think we need national white month along side every other ethenticity

5 days ago

ORCOPS

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