Oregon Coalition of Police and Sheriffs Endorses Kevin Barton for Washington County District Attorney

ORCOPS ENDORSES KEVIN BARTON FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY DISTRICT ATTORNEY

Contact: Daryl Turner, President
Oregon Coalition of Police and Sheriffs
503.225.9760
info@orcops.org

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Portland, OR, April 23, 2018 – When candidates stand with us, we stand with them. The Oregon Coalition of Police and Sheriffs (ORCOPS) board has voted to endorse Kevin Barton for Washington County District Attorney.

As a respected leader and Chief Deputy District Attorney, Kevin Barton has the experience and a proven track record of serving Washington County, ensuring the safety and stability of the community. Working with law enforcement, civic groups, and community partners to prioritize public safety — safer schools, streets, and neighborhoods —Kevin Barton is the best choice for Washington County District Attorney.

We agree with Barton, everyone has the right to live in safety without fear or worry of crime. And, when crime occurs, justice should follow. We appreciate the good work that he has done in the past and look forward to Barton championing the issues that are important to law enforcement and Washington County.

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The Oregon Coalition of Police & Sheriffs (ORCOPS) is a non-partisan organization that advocates on behalf of police officers, deputy sheriffs and other individuals in Oregon law enforcement agencies. ORCOPS serves as a source of leadership within the law enforcement community and aims to build trust between law enforcement officers and the communities we serve.

Download the Press Release >>> 04232018 ORCOPS Press Release Endorsement Barton for DA

Oregon Coalition of Police and Sheriffs Announces Legislative Endorsements

04172018 ORCOPS EndorsementsFB Note Image

Contact: Daryl Turner, President
Oregon Coalition of Police and Sheriffs
503.225.9760
info@orcops.org

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Portland, OR, April 17, 2018 – When candidates stand with us, we stand with them. The Oregon Coalition of Police and Sheriffs (ORCOPS) board has voted to endorse the following candidates:

For the 2018 Primary Election

  • Athena Goldberg – Candidate, Oregon Senate District 3
  • Senator Floyd Prozanski – Candidate, Oregon Senate District 4
  • Senator Elizabeth Steiner Hayward – Candidate, Oregon Senate District 17
  • Representative Caddy McKeown – Candidate, Oregon House District 9
  • Representative Nancy Nathanson – Candidate, Oregon House District 13
  • Representative Jeff Helfrich – Candidate, Oregon House District 52
  • Nathan Boddie, MD, MS – Candidate, Oregon House District 54

For the 2018 Primary AND General Election

  • Senator Betsy Johnson – Candidate, Oregon Senate District 16
  • Representative Jeff Barker – Candidate, Oregon House District 28

Additional general election endorsements will be made after the May Primary.

We appreciate the good work that these candidates and elected officials have done in the past, and look forward to them championing issues important to law enforcement in the State legislature.

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The Oregon Coalition of Police & Sheriffs (ORCOPS) is a non-partisan organization that advocates on behalf of police officers, deputy sheriffs and other individuals in Oregon law enforcement agencies. ORCOPS serves as a source of leadership within the law enforcement community and aims to build trust between law enforcement officers and the communities we serve.

Download Press Release >>> 04172018 ORCOPS Press Release Endorsements

Oregon Coalition of Police and Sheriffs and Oregon Council of Police Associations Announce Merger

Contact: Daryl Turner, President
Oregon Coalition of Police and Sheriffs
503.225.9760
info@orcops.org

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Unifying the organizations brings together the two preeminent advocacy groups for Oregon’s law enforcement professionals

Portland, OR, March 27, 2018 – The Oregon Coalition of Police and Sheriffs (ORCOPS) and the Oregon Council of Police Associations (OCPA) are pleased to announce their merger. The combined organization will provide an even greater ability for law enforcement professionals in our state to connect Oregonians to the role they play in keeping our communities safe.

The newly merged organizations will continue to operate under the ORCOPS banner. Scott Dillon, the former President of OCPA, will continue his advocacy as a Vice President of ORCOPS.

“The core of ORCOPS’ mission is to serve as a source of leadership within the law enforcement community and to build trust between law enforcement officers and the communities we serve. That vital mission will be better served with one, consolidated voice”, said Daryl Turner, President of ORCOPS.

“With this merger, our consolidated voice on legislative matters will be significantly strengthened,” said Scott Dillon, Vice President of ORCOPS.

Both organizations have worked tirelessly to ensure our State lawmakers understand the work of law enforcement. We have seen recent success in maintaining fair and reasonable use of force standards, implementing flexible State policy that allows for local control over law enforcement tools such as body cameras, and ensuring that pension benefit promises are honored.

ORCOPS is proud of the amazing work our members do on a daily basis and look forward to continued advocacy for Oregon’s law enforcement professionals.

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The Oregon Coalition of Police & Sheriffs (ORCOPS) is a non-partisan organization that advocates on behalf of police officers, deputy sheriffs and other individuals in Oregon law enforcement agencies. ORCOPS serves as a source of leadership within the law enforcement community and aims to build trust between law enforcement officers and the communities we serve.

Download Press Release >>> 03272018 ORCOPS Press Release Announcing Merger with OCPA

2018 Legislative Session Report

LEGISLATIVE WRAP UP

The ORCOPS lobby team saw some 2018 Legislative Session successes and laid the foundation for the long 2019 Legislative Session. We continued to build support with legislators for policies that matter to our members.  But there are challenges ahead and still plenty of work to do.

House Bill 4056

Families of fallen officers in Oregon are supposed to have scholarship funds available to college eligible students. But an inconsistency between the rules for the Public Safety Memorial Fund, the Higher Education Coordinating Commission, and federal benefits some families of fallen officers were missing out on assistance for higher education. HB 4056 corrects this gap. The ORCOPS lobby team worked closely with Representative Andy Olson (R-Albany) and Representative Brad Witt (D-Clatskanie), who introduced the legislation. As the bill went to committee, we visited each member multiple times to answer questions and provide clarification. The bill had strong support in the House Judiciary Committee and ultimately sailed through both chambers.  It’s now on the Governor’s desk, where she is expected to sign it.

Senate Bill 1562

This bill was introduced by State Senator Kathleen Taylor (D-Milwaukie), It increases the penalties for the crime of strangulation. ORCOPS submitted a letter of support for this bill. It passed easily through the Senate and the House, and is now on the Governor’s desk where she is expected to sign it.

House Bill 4122

This bill corrects an oversight and allows a group of officers at OHSU the opportunity to join the Public Employees Retirement System. Right before session ended, it was on a good trajectory, having left the House Committee on Business and Labor went to  the Committee on Ways & Means. Our team conducted multiple one-on-one conversations with Ways & Means committee members and we had created a good deal of support for the bill. OHSU was also in full support. However, Senate President Peter Courtney (D-Salem) chose to end the Legislative Session a week ahead of the previously-established calendar, eliminating the possibility of passing a number of bills still in Ways & Means, including HB 4122.  We had some good conversations with Senator Betsy Johnson (D-Scappoose) who has expressed interest in pushing the bill in the 2019 session.

Senate Bill 1531

This bill was introduced by Senator Lew Frederick (D-Portland), which originally would have imposed a mandate for police officers to get mental health counseling every two years. ORCOPS strongly opposed the mandatory provisions in the bill. The bill was heard in the Senate Judiciary Committee, which is chaired by Senator Floyd Prozanski (D-Eugene). Senator Prozanski opted not to move the bill out of committee, which meant the bill stalled out during session. In lieu of the bill’s passage, ORCOPS has been working with Senator Prozanski’s office on creating a workgroup that will meet during the legislative interim. We anticipate the workgroup will develop an alternate proposal for the 2019 session that focuses on voluntary access to wellness programs for a wide range of first responders, and possibly include improvements in workers compensation protections.

On the horizon, we’re expecting a landmark ruling later this year from the U.S. Supreme Court in Janus v. AFSCME. The Court is widely expected to rule that labor organizations cannot require fair share dues payments from non-members. ORCOPS has had some constructive discussions with lawmakers and Legislative attorneys. We’re looking for ways to best protect fair share payments after the U.S. Supreme Court delivers its ruling. We are working with stakeholders to prepare legislation that would protect members from having to use their resources to support “free riders” who opt not to contribute to the costs of negotiating or enforcing a labor agreement. We plan to begin discussions on this concept as soon as the U.S. Supreme Court unveils its opinion.

Finally, we are sad to report that Representative Andy Olson has decided to retire from the Oregon Legislature. Rep Olson has long been a friend to law enforcement and a key ally in the House. We wish him well in his retirement.

Thank you for your continued support. Please do not hesitate to contact me with any questions or legislative concepts.

Daryl Turner, President
Oregon Coalition of Police & Sheriffs

Bills We Are Watching

ORCOPS Legislative Updates (1)

Last week was the deadline for bills to move out of committee. We’re now waiting for a number of bills we’re tracking to percolate through to the other chamber. Committee hearings should begin later this week or the beginning of next week.

Bills we’re watching:

House Bill 4122

This bill corrects an oversight and allows a group of officers at OHSU the opportunity to join the Public Employees Retirement System. It has left the House Committee on Business and Labor and is now in Ways & Means. We’ve begun one-on-one meetings with the Ways & Means Committee members and staff. Our conversations have included the fact that the bill has a minimal fiscal impact and is a matter of basic fairness. OHSU is in full support of the bill as well. So far, we’ve had excellent conversations with committee members, and we expect that to continue. No hearing has yet been set in Ways & Means.

House Bill 4056

Due to inconsistencies between the rules for the Public Safety Memorial Fund, the Higher Education Coordinating Commission, and federal benefits, some families of fallen officers are missing out on assistance for higher education. This bill corrects that gap. The bill is in the House of Representatives, waiting on a vote. We expect it to pass the House floor today, Wednesday, February 21, and move to the Senate side.

Senate Bill 1562

Introduced by State Senator Kathleen Taylor (D-Milwaukie), Senate Bill 1562 increases the penalties for the crime of strangulation. ORCOPS submitted a letter of support for this bill and passed the Senate this morning 28-0.

We will continue to provide updates during this short Legislative Session.

2018 Legislative Session is Underway

The 2018 Legislative Session began on Monday, February 5 and is now is well underway. It’s only a five week session, which means the work is moving at an incredibly quick pace. As always, the ORCOPS team did a great deal of preparation work before session began, laying the groundwork to do everything possible to benefit our members. We’ve also situated ourselves as the “go-to” resource when legislators want to know how public policy changes may affect the working conditions for Oregon’s law enforcement officers.

Here’s what we’ve been working on so far:

House Bill 4122

This bill was submitted on behalf of ORCOPS, and is one of our highest priorities in the session. The bill would correct an oversight and allow a group of officers at OHSU the opportunity to join the Public Employees Retirement System. We worked closely with Representative Jeff Barker (D-Beaverton) and Representative Chris Gorsek (D-Gresham) who stood alongside us as we presented the bill to the House Committee on Business and Labor. The bill passed out of the committee with a unanimous vote and a “do pass” recommendation. It’s now headed to House Ways and Means Committee. The bill has been assigned a “minimal” fiscal impact, which means its effect on the state budget is negligible, and the committee is more likely pass it through to the House and Senate floors for a vote.

House Bill 4056

We’re working this bill to correct a gap in benefits for families of fallen or disabled officers. Because of inconsistencies between the rules for the Public Safety Memorial Fund, the Higher Education Coordinating Commission, and federal benefits, some families are missing out on assistance for higher education. Representative Andy Olson (R-Albany) and Representative Brad Witt (D-Clatskanie) introduced this bill and have been working with families of fallen officers to make sure these oversights are fixed. Representative Jeff Barker is the Chair of the House Judiciary Committee where the bill is being heard and has made this a priority.  A bipartisan remedy is in the works to close the gap, and ensure all families of fallen or disabled officers get what they need to send their children to college.

Senate Bill 1531

This bill was introduced by Senator Lew Frederick (D-Portland), which originally would have imposed a mandate for police officers to get mental health counseling every two years. ORCOPS has strongly opposed the mandatory provision in the bill. The bill was heard in the Senate Judiciary Committee, which is chaired by Senator Floyd Prozanski (D-Eugene). Senator Prozanski opted not to move the bill out of committee, so it’s not likely to pass this session. ORCOPS has been working with Senator Frederick’s office and talking with the Senate Judiciary Committee members on something for the 2019 session that would allow first responders voluntary access to wellness programs alongside an increase in benefits and improved workers compensation provisions.

Behind the scenes, the lobby team continues to have good conversations with staff and legislators about the priorities for ORCOPS.

SB 1531

Senate Bill 1531

This bill was introduced by Senator Lew Frederick (D-Portland), which originally would have imposed a mandate for police officers to get mental health counseling every two years. ORCOPS has strongly opposed the mandatory provision in the bill. The bill was heard in the Senate Judiciary Committee, which is chaired by Senator Floyd Prozanski (D-Eugene). Senator Prozanski opted not to move the bill out of committee, so it’s not likely to pass this session. ORCOPS has been working with Senator Frederick’s office and talking with the Senate Judiciary Committee members on something for the 2019 session that would allow first responders voluntary access to wellness programs alongside an increase in benefits and improved workers compensation provisions.

HB 4056

House Bill 4056

UPDATE: February 21, 2018

Due to inconsistencies between the rules for the Public Safety Memorial Fund, the Higher Education Coordinating Commission, and federal benefits, some families of fallen officers are missing out on assistance for higher education. This bill corrects that gap. The bill is in the House of Representatives, waiting on a vote. We expect it to pass the House floor today, Wednesday, February 21, and move to the Senate side.

February 14, 2018

We’re working this bill to correct a gap in benefits for families of fallen or disabled officers. Because of inconsistencies between the rules for the Public Safety Memorial Fund, the Higher Education Coordinating Commission, and federal benefits, some families are missing out on assistance for higher education. Representative Andy Olson (R-Albany) and Representative Brad Witt (D-Clatskanie) introduced this bill and have been working with families of fallen officers to make sure these oversights are fixed. Representative Jeff Barker is the Chair of the House Judiciary Committee where the bill is being heard and has made this a priority.  A bipartisan remedy is in the works to close the gap, and ensure all families of fallen or disabled officers get what they need to send their children to college.

HB 4122

House Bill 4122

UPDATE: February 21, 2018

This bill corrects an oversight and allows a group of officers at OHSU the opportunity to join the Public Employees Retirement System. It has left the House Committee on Business and Labor and is now in Ways & Means. We’ve begun one-on-one meetings with the Ways & Means Committee members and staff. Our conversations have included the fact that the bill has a minimal fiscal impact and is a matter of basic fairness.  OHSU is in full support of the bill as well. So far, we’ve had excellent conversations with committee members, and we expect that to continue. No hearing has yet been set in Ways & Means

February 14, 2018

This bill was submitted on behalf of ORCOPS, and is one of our highest priorities in the session. The bill would correct an oversight and allow a group of officers at OHSU the opportunity to join the Public Employees Retirement System. We worked closely with Representative Jeff Barker (D-Beaverton) and Representative Chris Gorsek (D-Gresham) who stood alongside us as we presented the bill to the House Committee on Business and Labor. The bill passed out of the committee with a unanimous vote and a “do pass” recommendation. It’s now headed to House Ways and Means Committee. The bill has been assigned a “minimal” fiscal impact, which means its effect on the state budget is negligible, and the committee is more likely pass it through to the House and Senate floors for a vote.