ORCOPS Mission

The Oregon Coalition of Police & Sheriffs (ORCOPS) is a non-partisan organization that advocates on behalf of  police officers, deputy sheriffs and other individuals in Oregon law enforcement agencies. ORCOPS serves as a source of leadership within the law enforcement community and aims to build trust between law enforcement officers and the communities we serve.


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
October 15, 2018                       

Former Fire Fighter and Police Officer rides his motorcycle from Seattle to Las Vegas for PTSD

Police, Fire Fighters, and Corrections Officers Announce New Legislation to Ensure Public Safety Personnel Access to PTSD/PTSI Treatment

Portland, OR – First responders are particularly vulnerable to Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) due to the amount of consistent first-hand exposure to extremely stressful and traumatic experiences. As we understand more about the mental health impact and how PTSD and Post Traumatic Stress Injury (PTSI) is becoming an epidemic in first responder professions, State Representatives Andrea Salinas and Paul Evans joined public safety officers today to announce the introduction of new legislation recognizing PTSD/PTSI as an occupational illness in Oregon. The bill helps protect our public servants who put themselves on the front lines for our communities every day.

“Given ongoing budget constraints and increased pressure on fewer responders, we must recognize the costs we are incurring in the lives of those we send out to defend us,” said Rep. Evans, “It’s the right thing to do.”

To commemorate the announcement, retired police officer and fire fighter Jeff Shepard made a stop in Portland on his West Coast Ride 4 Relief Tour to bring awareness to first responders living with PTSD/PTSI. Shephard was diagnosed with PTSD after an ambush shooting in his police patrol car. He underwent therapy, returned to work, and realized his life-long dream of becoming a motor officer. But within the first year of Shepard’s career on a motorcycle, he was the target of an explosion that turned his life upside down. He quickly discovered there was little support or information for officers specifically struggling with what felt like the shame of PTSD and he was medically retired from his department.

Shepard said, “I recognized there was an epidemic of first responders dealing with the same thing I was.” This inspired Shepard’s fierce advocacy and the Ride 4 Relief, providing an opportunity for conversation to bring people together in support of those who sacrifice so much for our safety.

Groups representing police officers (Oregon Coalition of Police and Sheriffs-ORCOPS), fire fighters (Oregon State Fire Fighters Council-OSFFC), and corrections officers (Association of Oregon Corrections Employees-AOCE) worked together to craft legislation that makes a very simple change to the state statute. Currently, there is a very high bar that our public servants face when having to prove the cumulative trauma of stress disorders such as PTSI. Instead of these employees having to prove that their trauma-stress related disorders are employment-related, the employer would be required to prove that they are not.

“There is a stigma attached to PTSD and officers may be reluctant to seek treatment or file a claim because it’s incredibly difficult to prove that it’s employment-related. This legislation helps remove that stigma and supports better mental health,” said Daryl Turner, President of ORCOPS and the Portland Police Association.

The PTSD/PTSI presumption legislation strengthens our support of police, fire fighters, and corrections officers in several ways, including:

  • Recognizing the mental health impact and trauma that first responders experience while on the front line of public safety and emergency response.
  • Promoting ongoing wellness among fire fighters, corrections employees, and law enforcement officers by showing that legitimate claims will be honored.
  • Assisting with recruitment and hiring, when employers can better assure new employees that job-related conditions will not subject them to an adversarial legal process.

“Each lawmaker we have approached recognizes that access to mental health treatment for our public safety servants is paramount to a safe Oregon and have pledged their unwavering support of this concept,” said Karl Koenig, President of OSFFC.

The PTSD/PTSI presumption legislation helps police, fire fighters, and corrections officers get the help they need after a job-related trauma.

###

The Oregon Coalition of Police & Sheriffs (ORCOPS) is a non-partisan organization that advocates on behalf of police officers, deputy sheriffs and other individuals in Oregon law enforcement agencies. ORCOPS serves as a source of leadership within the law enforcement community and aims to build trust between law enforcement officers and the communities we serve.

Contact: Daryl Turner, President
Angela Orr, Communications
Oregon Coalition of Police and Sheriffs
503.225.9760
info@orcops.org      

Download:

10152018 PTSD Presumption Press Release FINAL pdf

PTSD-presumption-bill_handout_03


3 days ago

ORCOPS

Protest events in Portland have become hotbeds of violence. Protestors, often armed with makeshift weapons, have fought each other, assaulted community members, and hurled objects at police officers. Those bad acts by the few have drowned out the voices of the many who just want to peacefully speak their minds. Portland is not necessarily alone in seeing violence at protests. For example, Charlottesville, Virginia experienced one of the darkest days in recent memory when a protest event turned deadly.

Prior to the August 4, 2018 protest in Portland, there was fear and anxiety along with predictions that this protest had the potential to become equal to or worse than the deadly protest clash in Charlottesville, Virginia. Chief Outlaw and the Portland Police Bureau command staff, in conjunction with Mayor Wheeler’s office and several other City bureaus, put together a strategic plan to prepare for the violence that threatened public safety in our City.

One of the most important elements of this strategic planning was intelligence gathering, especially regarding the two likely volatile factions, the far-right Patriot Prayer group and left-wing anti-fascist groups like Antifa. The strategy and planning worked; the Police Bureau’s proactive response prevented any major clashes between the two groups.

Now, months later, text messages between PPB Lt. Niiya and Patriot Prayer leader Joey Gibson have come under scrutiny. Our elected City officials tout “fairness”, “transparency”, and “accountability” as cornerstones of City government. Yet, with only a small piece of the facts in hand, City Hall has already rushed to judgment and condemned Lt. Niiya. The knee jerk responses from City Hall are glaring:

💬 Mayor Wheeler called the texts “disturbing” and said, “Community members have long expressed concerns about police bias during demonstrations. Incidents like this contribute to the distrust that so many people have about the Portland Police Bureau.”

💬 Commissioner Chloe Eudaly said, “There is an inappropriate relationship between some PPB members and Patriot Prayer.”

💬 Commissioner JoAnn Hardesty said, “This simply confirms what many in the community have already known, there are members of the Portland Police force who work in collusion with right-wing extremists.”

With only part of the story, City Hall has labeled as biased and racist over 1,000 public servants in the Police Bureau.

Before passing judgment, it’s the job of our City officials to gather the facts. With Lt. Niiya, the public only knows that he was speaking to one extremist, protest organizer. The public doesn’t know:

❓ Whether Lt. Niiya tried to communicate or in fact communicated with Antifa or other “left-wing” protest organizers;

❓ Whether PPB’s policies and practices specifically call for or allow for intelligence gathering along the lines of what Lt. Niiya was doing;

❓ Whether Lt. Niiya’s supervisors authorized him to communicate with protestor organizers, or at least were aware that he was communicating with them;

❓ Whether the Police Commissioner (our Mayor) or his staff were aware of Lt. Niiya’s communications; and

❓ Whether the Police Commissioner (our Mayor) or his staff were communicating with Lt. Niiya about his discussions with protest organizers.

These are all important questions that need to be asked and answered. Why? Because the public has the right to know the whole story before any of us pass judgment and condemn our public servants.

My experience is that those familiar with law enforcement recognize that Lt. Niiya was performing his duties according to not only PPB protocol but also according to best practices used by police agencies nationwide for the safety and protection of those involved in protests and free speech events. On top of that, my gut feeling is that we will find out that the Mayor’s office, as part of the strategic planning team, knew about the strategy behind and context of Lt. Niiya’s communications with Patriot Prayer and other organizations.

Transparency, accountability, and good leadership hinges on putting facts ahead of political agendas. Pushing out sensationalized soundbites and one-sided stories ahead of an investigation does a disservice to our citizens and our rank and file officers, who rightfully have grave concerns regarding the leadership of our City.

Daryl Turner, PPA PresidentProtest events in Portland have become hotbeds of violence. Protestors, often armed with makeshift weapons, have fought each other, assaulted community members, and hurled objects at police officers. Those bad acts by the few have drowned out the voices of the many who just want to peacefully speak their minds. Portland is not necessarily alone in seeing violence at protests. For example, Charlottesville, Virginia experienced one of the darkest days in recent memory when a protest event turned deadly. Prior to the August 4, 2018 protest in Portland, there was fear and anxiety along with predictions that this protest had the potential to become equal to or worse than the deadly protest clash in Charlottesville, Virginia. Chief Outlaw and the Portland Police Bureau command staff, in conjunction with Mayor Wheeler’s office and several other City bureaus, put together a strategic plan to prepare for the violence that threatened public safety in our City. One of the most important elements of this strategic planning was intelligence gathering, especially regarding the two likely volatile factions, the far-right Patriot Prayer group and left-wing anti-fascist groups like Antifa. The strategy and planning worked; the Police Bureau’s proactive response prevented any major clashes between the two groups. Now, months later, text messages between PPB Lt. Niiya and Patriot Prayer leader Joey Gibson have come under scrutiny. Our elected City officials tout “fairness”, “transparency”, and “accountability” as cornerstones of City government. Yet, with only a small piece of the facts in hand, City Hall has already rushed to judgment and condemned Lt. Niiya. The knee jerk responses from City Hall are glaring: 💬 Mayor Wheeler called the texts “disturbing” and said, “Community members have long expressed concerns about police bias during demonstrations. Incidents like this contribute to the distrust that so many people have about the Portland Police Bureau.” 💬 Commissioner Chloe Eudaly said, “There is an inappropriate relationship between some PPB members and Patriot Prayer.” 💬 Commissioner JoAnn Hardesty said, “This simply confirms what many in the community have already known, there are members of the Portland Police force who work in collusion with right-wing extremists.” With only part of the story, City Hall has labeled as biased and racist over 1,000 public servants in the Police Bureau. Before passing judgment, it’s the job of our City officials to gather the facts. With Lt. Niiya, the public only knows that he was speaking to one extremist, protest organizer. The public doesn’t know: ❓ Whether Lt. Niiya tried to communicate or in fact communicated with Antifa or other “left-wing” protest organizers; ❓ Whether PPB’s policies and practices specifically call for or allow for intelligence gathering along the lines of what Lt. Niiya was doing; ❓ Whether Lt. Niiya’s supervisors authorized him to communicate with protestor organizers, or at least were aware that he was communicating with them; ❓ Whether the Police Commissioner (our Mayor) or his staff were aware of Lt. Niiya’s communications; and ❓ Whether the Police Commissioner (our Mayor) or his staff were communicating with Lt. Niiya about his discussions with protest organizers. These are all important questions that need to be asked and answered. Why? Because the public has the right to know the whole story before any of us pass judgment and condemn our public servants. My experience is that those familiar with law enforcement recognize that Lt. Niiya was performing his duties according to not only PPB protocol but also according to best practices used by police agencies nationwide for the safety and protection of those involved in protests and free speech events. On top of that, my gut feeling is that we will find out that the Mayor’s office, as part of the strategic planning team, knew about the strategy behind and context of Lt. Niiya’s communications with Patriot Prayer and other organizations. Transparency, accountability, and good leadership hinges on putting facts ahead of political agendas. Pushing out sensationalized soundbites and one-sided stories ahead of an investigation does a disservice to our citizens and our rank and file officers, who rightfully have grave concerns regarding the leadership of our City. Daryl Turner, PPA President
... See MoreSee Less

Protest events in Portland have become hotbeds of violence. Protestors, often armed with makeshift weapons, have fought each other, assaulted community members, and hurled objects at police officers. Those bad acts by the few have drowned out the voices of the many who just want to peacefully speak their minds. Portland is not necessarily alone in seeing violence at protests. For example, Charlottesville, Virginia experienced one of the darkest days in recent memory when a protest event turned deadly. 

Prior to the August 4, 2018 protest in Portland, there was fear and anxiety along with predictions that this protest had the potential to become equal to or worse than the deadly protest clash in Charlottesville, Virginia. Chief Outlaw and the Portland Police Bureau command staff, in conjunction with Mayor Wheeler’s office and several other City bureaus, put together a strategic plan to prepare for the violence that threatened public safety in our City. 

One of the most important elements of this strategic planning was intelligence gathering, especially regarding the two likely volatile factions, the far-right Patriot Prayer group and left-wing anti-fascist groups like Antifa. The strategy and planning worked; the Police Bureau’s proactive response prevented any major clashes between the two groups. 

Now, months later, text messages between PPB Lt. Niiya and Patriot Prayer leader Joey Gibson have come under scrutiny. Our elected City officials tout “fairness”, “transparency”, and “accountability” as cornerstones of City government. Yet, with only a small piece of the facts in hand, City Hall has already rushed to judgment and condemned Lt. Niiya. The knee jerk responses from City Hall are glaring:

💬 Mayor Wheeler called the texts “disturbing” and said, “Community members have long expressed concerns about police bias during demonstrations. Incidents like this contribute to the distrust that so many people have about the Portland Police Bureau.”

💬 Commissioner Chloe Eudaly said, “There is an inappropriate relationship between some PPB members and Patriot Prayer.”

💬 Commissioner JoAnn Hardesty said, “This simply confirms what many in the community have already known, there are members of the Portland Police force who work in collusion with right-wing extremists.”

With only part of the story, City Hall has labeled as biased and racist over 1,000 public servants in the Police Bureau. 

Before passing judgment, it’s the job of our City officials to gather the facts. With Lt. Niiya, the public only knows that he was speaking to one extremist, protest organizer. The public doesn’t know:

❓ Whether Lt. Niiya tried to communicate or in fact communicated with Antifa or other “left-wing” protest organizers;

❓ Whether PPB’s policies and practices specifically call for or allow for intelligence gathering along the lines of what Lt. Niiya was doing;

❓ Whether Lt. Niiya’s supervisors authorized him to communicate with protestor organizers, or at least were aware that he was communicating with them;

❓ Whether the Police Commissioner (our Mayor) or his staff were aware of Lt. Niiya’s communications; and

❓ Whether the Police Commissioner (our Mayor) or his staff were communicating with Lt. Niiya about his discussions with protest organizers.

These are all important questions that need to be asked and answered. Why? Because the public has the right to know the whole story before any of us pass judgment and condemn our public servants. 

My experience is that those familiar with law enforcement recognize that Lt. Niiya was performing his duties according to not only PPB protocol but also according to best practices used by police agencies nationwide for the safety and protection of those involved in protests and free speech events. On top of that, my gut feeling is that we will find out that the Mayor’s office, as part of the strategic planning team, knew about the strategy behind and context of Lt. Niiya’s communications with Patriot Prayer and other organizations. 

Transparency, accountability, and good leadership hinges on putting facts ahead of political agendas. Pushing out sensationalized soundbites and one-sided stories ahead of an investigation does a disservice to our citizens and our rank and file officers, who rightfully have grave concerns regarding the leadership of our City. 

Daryl Turner, PPA President

 

Comment on Facebook

Ted Squealer will not be happy until PPB is replaced with his buddies Antifa.

Good communication is a key for effective policing.

This doesn't just happen in Portland.

As a Portlander, I stand behind the Portland Police 100%. Eudaly is a whack job!

4 days ago

ORCOPS

Let's raise our hot cocoa cups to the 19 polar plungers from the Salem Police Department and the Willamette Valley Communications Center 911! These officers and dispatchers made a pact to run into the chilly waters of Crystal Lake in Corvallis on a cool February morning to raise funds for Special Olympics Oregon. They raised $3,600 (but they're still counting) and all the monies will go to support our local area Special Olympians! Thank you for representing our community today and taking a #PlungeForAPurpose and #FreezinForAReason! ... See MoreSee Less

Image attachment

1 week ago

ORCOPS

👏 to the Eugene Police Department and their participation in this year's Polar Plunge ❄️❄️❄️Polar Plunge was extra cold this year but worth it! Good times supporting Eugene Polar Plunge for Special Olympics with friends! ... See MoreSee Less

👏 to the Eugene Police Department and their participation in this years Polar Plunge ❄️❄️❄️Image attachment

1 week ago

ORCOPS

Last week, Portland Police Bureau's Officer Streed spoke to a Girl Scout Troop about what it means to be courageous and strong. They had a great conversation and the girls had many great questions!Officer Streed spoke to a Girl Scout Troop about what it means to be courageous and strong. They had a great conversations and the girls had many great questions. ... See MoreSee Less

Last week, Portland Police Bureaus Officer Streed spoke to a Girl Scout Troop about what it means to be courageous and strong. They had a great conversation and the girls had many great questions!Image attachment

2 weeks ago

ORCOPS

Clackamas County Sheriff's Office #K9 Grimm was pretty busy last week 🐾⚡️

It started with that 2.5-hour suspect track we talked about on Feb. 6 ...

… and it ended with him helping us locate over 38 lbs. (yes, POUNDS) of meth during a separate traffic stop.

Nice work, Grimm!

www.instagram.com/p/Btvju9HjNJz/#K9 Grimm was pretty busy last week. It started with that 2.5-hour suspect track we talked about on Feb. 6 ... … and it ended with him helping us locate over 38 lbs. (yes, POUNDS) of meth during a separate traffic stop. Nice work, Grimm! https://www.instagram.com/p/Btvju9HjNJz/
... See MoreSee Less

Clackamas County Sheriffs Office #K9 Grimm was pretty busy last week 🐾⚡️

It started with that 2.5-hour suspect track we talked about on Feb. 6 ...

… and it ended with him helping us locate over 38 lbs. (yes, POUNDS) of meth during a separate traffic stop.

Nice work, Grimm!

https://www.instagram.com/p/Btvju9HjNJz/

 

Comment on Facebook

Tami Bulla did you see this?

Atta boy!!!

Dashiell

Good boy officer

Good Boy

Good boy

Good dog! Great job you two!

Good job officers

Bless Grimm's little heart...!!!!

Good dog!!

GOOD BOY, GOOD BOY!

38 pounds ! Truly , dirtbags abound !

Brav Hund!!

Good dog!

Good dog, get these drug dealers off the street

Great job Grimm

Love the name, Good dog officer Grimm!

Way to go Grimm! ❤️

Good Job !!

Go get em Grimm!!

Good boy Grimm, thank you for getting that crap off the streets.

Good boy Grimm!!

Great work Officer Grimm!

Atta boy Grimm......Good dog....Great dog.....

Well done, Grimm ❤️🐾🐾🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸

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